Technology and Entertainment

As a former broadcaster (who still appears on the radio regularly) and founder of an internet start-up company, I realize the importance of technology and innovation. As a member of the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Intellectual Property and the Internet, I work to ensure an open Internet, providing protections for both content creators and Internet innovators.
One of the reasons the internet is such a job creator and economic engine is it is one area that is not over regulated by the government. We can’t let the government cripple its flow of information and commerce that drives our economic, political and cultural innovation. The Internet is one of the last areas of unregulated frontier and that is what inspires our new innovators today.

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On the air at KKTX in Corpus Christi.
Technologies, like broadband, have the potential to provide fast and affordable access to the Internet for consumers and innovators, particularly in rural communities. As a member of the Congressional Internet Caucus I will continue to promote legislation that creates new opportunities for users, while eliminating unnecessary red tape and regulation from Federal agencies.
The Constitution calls on Congress, “To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts” by securing legal rights. We must protect innovators’ and content creators’ intellectual property rights while not crippling innovation with frivolous infringement litigation. We must also not stifle creativity and education by eroding the public domain and the concept of fair use. There is a delicate balance that must be struck between the interests of copyright holders with those of the general public.
I will continue to fiercely protect the property rights of all owners, including patents, which are crucial to our country’s prosperity. I am committed to meaningful patent reform that protects innovators, while ensuring that legitimate third parties are not subject to frivolous litigation for non-infringing uses from “patent trolls.”